I’m More Confused About What Crowfall Is Now That Their Kickstarter Launched

The Kickstarter for Crowfall, an MMO in development, just started yesterday. Taking a look at the Kickstarter advertising for the game, though, has left me more confused about what this game is trying to be. From news articles like those found on the new MassivelyOP.net, voxels, destructive environments, and strategy will be the general focus of the game, but the fundraising pitch makes it sound like it’s including a lot more than that. “It’s like Game of Thrones meets Eve Online” reads a tagline on the fundraising page. I’m reminded, though, of a lot of other games when you start going through the feature list.

One of the game’s shining mechanics seems to be that game locations will periodically reset. It appears that there will be two main areas for players to run around in, the “Eternal Kingdoms” and the “Campaign Worlds”. The “Eternal Kingdoms” seems to be where players will set up their main bases of permanent operation. Guilds will presumably be able to build castles and fortresses, and these estates will be around indefinitely. I’m thinking similar to Landmark here. Landmark with possible PvP focus, too, not just a building simulator.

The “Campaign Worlds”, on the other hand, will be the real battlegrounds of the game and will only be around for limited periods of time, until the resources are gathered and your side comes out victorious or not, at which point you return back to the Eternal Kingdoms. So these are like matches then, matches that take a while to complete but that do have a set “win” condition. Win conditions like A Tale in the Desert but more violence? You would be able to collect your spoils and bring them back to the Eternal Kingdoms to improve your character and holdings, though, so maybe not like ATiTD. Kind of feeling like it’s approaching Guild Wars 2 style World vs World a bit, but with actual win conditions instead of just time. In fact, the action combat appears to be very GW2-esque as well.

So maybe the tagline should be “Guild Wars 2’s WvW meets A Tale in the Desert meets Landmark”? I mean, that’s not as badass sounding as “Game of Thrones meets Eve Online” (both very “hardcore” IPs), but it does help me visualize it better. But then they throw this in there

“The beginning of each Campaign is like the first round of Civilization: players are dropped into a harsh environment, surrounded by Fog-of-War. The Worlds are filled with deadly monsters, haunted ruins, abandoned quarries… and the most dangerous predator of all, other players.

Craft weapons, scavenge armor, secure a stronghold, forge alliances and conquer the World.”

So… like H1Z1? Are the Campaign Worlds more survival-focused, maybe? This makes it sound like they’ll have a scavenger, band of survivors feel to them, where you battle not just the environment, but also other players to achieve the win conditions. No zombies, though. Well, maybe. These Campaign Worlds are slowly falling, entropy having it’s way with them, and the “Hunger” seems to be a driving factor in that. The Hunger seems to be the game’s main antagonist, a relentless, singularly focused enemy without remorse or empathy. Like the Borg, or… zombies. A rose by any other name.

But then they say they’re throwing in a heavy focus of strategy as well when they say “A seamless blend of an MMO with a large-scale Strategy game!” When mixed with PvP, “strategy” gaming is very reminiscent of MOBAs. Seeing as how MOBAs are wildly successful at the moment, I could see where they would also attempt this avenue for development as well.

So, then “Guild Wars 2 WvW meets A Tale in the Desert meets Landmark meets MOBAs meets H1Z1!” It certainly doesn’t roll off the tongue, does it? This is why I don’t work in advertising.

At it’s base, though, it sounds like the most important aspects will be Guilds, Territory, Crafting, and PvP. Doesn’t sound like it’d be up my alley, only because my jump-in-jump-out playstyle doesn’t mesh well with territory holdings and PvP focus, which is the realm of more dedicated players.

So although maybe it’s right now not sounding like it’d be for me, it does sound like it’s something fresh and really pushing the boundaries. So I give it a lot of respect, it’s trying new avenues of gameplay with systems that are relatively familiar, and combining them to create this new species of MMO. That is awesome.

Tons of time left to go, and it looks like hitting their $800,000 goal really won’t be a problem. So if Crowfall sounds like it would be a nice addition to the stable of games you’re already playing, go check it out.

//Ocho

– So what do you think? Does it remind you of any other games as well? Is this the pattern we should expect for the evolution of the MMO genre, combining traits of games already played to make something new? Do you think I’m wrong and “Shut up, Ocho, it’s Eve Online meets Game of Thrones like they said! Jeez! It’s not that confusing, ya noob!”

– All images used in this post are linked from the Crowfall Kickstarter page and are not my own screenshots.

Advertisements

Summer Gaming Patterns and Outside MMO Impressions

 

Assassins Creed

I am a creature of habit.

Sometimes those habits don’t quite mesh well with my hobbies, but that’s just the way it goes. Specifically, my gaming habits change dramatically with the changes of the seasons. I’ve found that during the fall and winter (last winter we got 68 inches of snow) I tend to stay indoors and will start picking up and playing more long-term games like MMOs a lot more seriously. During the summer, though, I head outdoors. BBQ’s, bars, camping, going down the shore, baseball games, disc golf, weekly Ultimate, you name it. So in the summer, gaming takes the far backseat. Sadly, writing about gaming goes with it. When I don’t play, I don’t have a lot to say (unless you want to hear about my Ultimate and disc golf exploits? Maybe?).

Walking Dead, Season 1

Walking Dead, Season 1. Complete. Damn, Telltale really is doing a fantastic job.

I realized I had a pattern to the way I play games way back during my young days of playing World of Warcraft. Back when I kept the subscription going year round on the “hope” that I would find time to play, but never did (what a fool I was). I found, though, that I kept coming back at the same time every year. Right in the middle of the Halloween festivities.

So from October to March, I’m all about gaming. From April to September, not so much.

This doesn’t mean that I’ve stopped playing entirely. Quite to the contrary, I’ve found my tastes shift. I’ve really started getting into single player and indie games, finishing up games like Assassin’s Creed 1 and 2. Also playing a lot more mobile games like Tiny Tower, games that I can pick up on the go (Note: I use the phrase “mobile” and “games” in the same sentence very loosely, these mobile things are more like psychological traps).

Tiny Tower

Tiny Tower. Seriously, this game should come with a Surgeon Generals warning.

The latest MMO offerings this Spring really haven’t been enough to draw me away from this pattern, either. Here are a few very off-the-cuff thoughts:

Landmark – A Minecraft clone with better graphics. Pass. Sidenote: Why did they remove the Everquest title from Landmark? Are they now backpedaling, and cutting any possible link that would have existed between the two games? Sorry, just seems a little shady.

Elder Scrolls Online – Yet another fantasy hack and slash themepark MMO, wearing the trappings of Elder Scrolls, one of my favorite series. I won’t lie, the setting of a game means a lot to me. It’s why I’m still such a big fan of Star Trek Online after all this time. But when they remove the soul of the series, TESO doesn’t have much left that hasn’t been done before. The title may say Elder Scrolls, but it just doesn’t have the *soul* of Elder Scrolls and that’s a major turn-off for me. If it had been the same engine, but any other IP, I might have been more interested.

Wildstar – Looks a lot better than the others, I’ll give it that, but even the premise of Open Beta didn’t entice me. The telegraphing system looks to be just an evolution of The Secret World’s style, which is fine, but nothing drastic. The art style, though gorgeous in it’s bright colors is too reminiscent of World of Warcraft’s cartoon styling for me to not be reminded of it at every turn. Finally, the “elder game” looks to also be trying to grab that piece of the Warcraft pie, using the same raid-or-die approach. What this all says is that the game simply isn’t for me. I’ll leave all the real time-investment-heavy stuff to those of you with more time and interest.

ArcheAge – This may be the only title that has really piqued my curiosity as of late, but I’m not sure why. I don’t think sandboxes and I make a good fit. I don’t have the time to invest or the inclination to use others pre-made efficient builds, which most sandboxes require. But the whole “paying for alphas and betas” thing seems too sketchy. Pay a lot of money to be a part of a buggy experience and the chance you might get really tired of the game before it even launches? Ha! No thanks. If anything, the cost to be a part of alphas and betas should be LESS than the cost of the game when it launches. Stop this enticing with items nonsense and entice with price. I’ll wait for release, whenever that will be, to see if I’m still interested.

Octodad, Dadliest Catch

Octodad: Dadliest Catch. Not a long game, but frustratingly fantastic. Not to mention some of the awesome one-liners.

But in the meantime, I’ve heard that The Secret World’s Tokyo is right around the corner. Even though the hype of it has long since faded, I’ve read that it is still very much worth the wait. Star Trek Online has released Season 9, and has a new Featured Episode, which I hear is one of their best ones yet. My backlog is still plenty full and needs trimming, and then I’m still working on that old resolution list.

In other words, don’t mind me. I’m still here, just more in the background, getting as much out of summer as I can. Even if that means less gaming.

// Ocho